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Careers in academia: the LGBTQ+ perspective. 23 April 2021 Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ+) people have often not been well represented in STEM careers. Academia should be an environment where sexuality and gender identity does not matter. Nevertheless, some LGBTQ+ scientists have faced discrimination. Last year, the Wellcome Trust commissioned Shift Learning to investigate research cultures*. The survey of over 4000 researchers revealed culture report 24% of respondents would not feel comfortable discussing LGBTQ+ identity discrimination in the workplace. Furthermore, 25% of LGBTQ+ participants who had experienced discrimination or harassment said this was due to sexuality. Therefore, often individuals in the LGBTQ+ community have opted to suppress their gender identity and sexual orientation, which is likely to negatively affect productivity and mental health. Sadly, LGBTQ+ individuals are also five times more likely to commit suicide (The TREVOR Project)**.
  • Careers in academia: the LGBTQ+ perspective. 23 April 2021 Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ+) people have often not been well represented in STEM careers. Academia should be an environment where sexuality and gender identity does not matter. Nevertheless, some LGBTQ+ scientists have faced discrimination. Last year, the Wellcome Trust commissioned Shift Learning to investigate research cultures*. The survey of over 4000 researchers revealed culture report 24% of respondents would not feel comfortable discussing LGBTQ+ identity discrimination in the workplace. Furthermore, 25% of LGBTQ+ participants who had experienced discrimination or harassment said this was due to sexuality. Therefore, often individuals in the LGBTQ+ community have opted to suppress their gender identity and sexual orientation, which is likely to negatively affect productivity and mental health. Sadly, LGBTQ+ individuals are also five times more likely to commit suicide (The TREVOR Project)**.
  • Researchers in CMM and the university continue the fight to eradicate deadly disease on World Tuberculosis Day 25 March 2021 Researchers at the University of Bristol are working on a number of different developments to finally end the TB epidemic.
  • CMM has been at the forefront of COVID-19 research 24 March 2021 As the COVID-19 pandemic hit the world, academics from across the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the University of Bristol joined together to understand the virus and the impact of the pandemic. Today [23 March] is a year since the first UK lockdown and their research is continuing to play a key role in global efforts to overcome the disease.
  • Using sound to shape the future of printing 16 March 2021 Researchers have developed a way to coax microscopic particles and droplets into precise patterns by harnessing the power of sound in air. The implications for printing, especially in the fields of medicine and electronics, are far-reaching.
  • High fructose diets could cause immune system damage 22 February 2021 New research led by Swansea University in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bristol and the Francis Crick Institute in London has indicated that consuming a diet high in the sugar fructose might prevent the proper functioning of peoples' immune systems in ways that has, until now, largely been unknown.
  • Eugenia Piddini: Celebrating International Day of Women and Girls in Science 10 February 2021 Drinalda Cela, a PhD student in CMM, interviewed Professor Eugenia Piddini in celebration of the UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science, exploring her research, the critical role of women in STEM and her own experience as a first-generation academic.
  • CMM Research Away Day 2021 25 January 2021 The School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine came together on 12 January 2021 for their annual Research Away Day
  • National consortium to study the threats of new SARS-CoV-2 variants 18 January 2021 A new national research project to study the effects of emerging mutations in SARS-CoV-2 is launched on 15 January. The £2.5 million UK Research and Innovation (UKRI)-funded 'G2P-UK' National Virology Consortium will study how mutations in the virus affect key outcomes such as how transmissible it is, the severity of COVID-19 it causes, and the effectiveness of vaccines and treatments.
  • Independent analysis finds the Oxford COVID-19 vaccine follows its programmed genetic instructions 23 October 2020 The AstraZeneca Oxford COVID-19 vaccine (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 and also known as AZD1222) now undergoing Phase III clinical trials, has already undergone rigorous testing to ensure the highest standards of quality and safety. Now a team at the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Bristol University has used recently developed techniques to further validate that the vaccine accurately follows the genetic instructions programmed into it by the Oxford team. This novel analysis provides even greater clarity and detail about how the vaccine successfully provokes a strong immune response.
  • Neuropilin-1 drives SARS-CoV-2 infectivity, finds breakthrough study 21 October 2020 In a major breakthrough an international team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has potentially identified what makes SARS-CoV-2 highly infectious and able to spread rapidly in human cells. The findings, published in Science on 20 October describe how the virus’s ability to infect human cells can be reduced by inhibitors that block a newly discovered interaction between virus and host, demonstrating a potential anti-viral treatment.
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