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Crack Arrest and Self-Healing in Composite Structures (CRASHCOMPS)

Crashcomps image

Crashcomps image

10 August 2008

University of Bristol (Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science) and Imperial College London (The Composites Centre ) have won £1.2M four-year research award from EPSRC and DSTL to develop methods to arrest, redirect and self-heal compression fracture in composite structures.

Crashcomps image

Crashcomps image

University of Bristol (Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science) and Imperial College London (The Composites Centre) have won a £1.2M four-year research award from EPSRC and DSTL to develop methods to arrest, redirect and self-heal compression fracture in composite structures. Currently, the 'no growth' approach (i.e. damage propagation from a defect constitutes failure) is the mindset of the composites industry, which has led to excessively heavy components, shackling of innovative design, and a need for frequent inspection during service. The aim of CRASHCOMPS is to exploit understanding of compressive damage modes and predictive models, to facilitate a step change in composite design philosophy, such that damage growth can be tolerated. Uniquely, composites offer the freedom to 'tailor' internal architecture, hybridise and introduce novel features in order to achieve such a capability.

A free annual CRASHCOMPS workshop will be held at University of Bristol and Imperial College London on alternate years, providing a forum for academics, researchers and industry to review the results and influence the direction of the programme. For further details of CRASHCOMPS, please contact Dr Ian Bond (I.P.Bond@bristol.ac.uk) and Dr Emile Greenhalgh (e.greenhalgh@imperial.ac.uk).

 


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