• African rondavel unveiled to celebrate the Botanic Garden's South Africa collection 22 May 2019 An African rondavel will be unveiled at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden tomorrow [Thursday 23 May] to celebrate the Garden's African heritage and its South Africa display in the Mediterranean climatic region. The thatched African-style hut will be officially opened by Beryl Ferguson, Board Chairperson of the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI).
  • 1 in 4 cats and 1 in 7 dogs carrying fleas with high levels of bacteria, finds Big Flea Project 10 May 2019 As many as 1 in 4 cats and 1 in 7 dogs are carrying fleas, and about 11 per cent of these fleas are infected with potentially pathogenic bacteria, according to a large-scale analysis of owned animals in the UK. Flea bites can be painful and can cause allergic reactions in cats and dogs which is why the Big Flea Project findings highlight the need to re-educate pet owners on flea prevention.
  • Peony garden opens at Botanic Garden 8 May 2019 With medicinal uses and many layers of symbolism peonies are one of the most important plants in Chinese culture. A new peony garden, which is unique to the West Country, will open at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden this Sunday [12 May]. The garden is the first stage of a planned Chinese Culture Garden, an extension of the Chinese Herb Garden, which was unveiled in 2010.
  • Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs 3 May 2019 The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 tonne giants so successful? A new study, published in Paleobiology, shows that their special adaptations in teeth and jaws and in their head crests were crucial, and provides new insights into how these innovations evolved.
  • The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees 1 May 2019 For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.
  • New satellite data sets reveal flood risk for vulnerable populations 18 April 2019 Scientists from the University of Bristol have modelled the likelihood of flooding in some of the world’s most hazardous zones to an unparalleled degree of accuracy.
  • Is one toe really better than three? How horses’ legs evolved for endurance travel rather than speed 18 April 2019 Palaeobiologists from the University of Bristol and Howard University (USA) have uncovered new evidence that suggests that horses’ legs have adapted over time to be optimised for endurance travel, rather than speed.
  • University of Bristol declares a climate emergency 17 April 2019 The University of Bristol is joining with other organisations and institutions across the country and the world to become the first UK university to declare a climate emergency, reaffirming our strong and positive commitment to take action on climate change.
  • Two academics honoured with Royal Society Fellows 17 April 2019 Two University of Bristol academics, Professors George Davey Smith and Michael Kendall, have achieved the rare distinction of being elected Fellows of the world's most eminent scientific academy, the Royal Society, for their exceptional contributions to science.
  • Come and see sculptural delights inspired by faraway shores 16 April 2019 A Tuareg musician from the Sahara wearing a traditional tagelmust-turban veil, Greek gods, multimedia figures, stained glass creations and bronze and marble sculptures based on Buddhist prayer wheels, are all waiting to welcome visitors to this year's University of Bristol Botanic Garden Easter Sculpture Festival.
  • Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow 16 April 2019 For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published Monday 15 April in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators.
  • Earth’s recovery from mass extinction could take millions of years 9 April 2019 How long will it take our biosphere to recover from the current climate crisis? It’s a question that makes for a sobering examination of Earth’s ongoing destruction.
  • Duke of Kent presents Botanic Garden volunteers with Queen's Award 4 April 2019 Volunteers from the University of Bristol Botanic Garden were presented with the Queen's Award for Voluntary Service (QAVS) at a ceremony held at the Garden yesterday [Tuesday 2 April]. The award - the MBE for volunteer groups - was awarded by HRH the Duke of Kent and the Lord Lieutenant of Bristol, Peaches Golding OBE, in recognition of the skill, dedication and enthusiasm of those who help to run and promote the work of the Garden.
  • Marine heatwave proves devastating to Shark Bay and dolphins, study finds 2 April 2019 Dolphin survival and reproductive rates suffered a significant decline following a 2011 marine heatwave affecting around 1,000km of Western Australia’s coastline. The findings, published in Current Biology and representing an international collaboration of researchers and universities, including Zurich and Bristol, have important implications for marine conservation and mitigating the effects of climate change.
  • Untangling the evolution of feeding strategies in ancient crocodiles 29 March 2019 Ancient aquatic crocodiles fed on softer and smaller prey than their modern counterparts and the evolution of skull shape and function allowed them to spread into new habitats, reveal paleobiology researchers from the University of Bristol and UCL.
  • ‘Nightmarish’ antlions’ spiral digging techniques create effective and deadly traps 27 March 2019 A team of biologists and physicists, led by the University of Bristol, have uncovered new insights into how antlions – one of the fiercest and most terrifying predators in the insect kingdom – build their deadly pit traps.
  • Half a billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies 22 March 2019 One of the ocean’s little known carnivores has been allocated a new place in the evolutionary tree of life after scientists discovered its unmistakable resemblance with other sea-floor dwelling creatures.
  • A Biography of Professor Jane Memmott 15 March 2019 “I’m still smiling!” was Professor Jane Memmott’s reply to being asked her feelings about becoming the newly-elected president of the British Ecological Society. In an office filled with shelves of books, a case of preserved butterflies, feathers from various species and a plant collection to rival the rest of the life sciences building, I interviewed Professor Jane Memmott on her career, interests and her journey towards the prestigious position she holds today.
  • ‘Get engaged to save planet’ Sir David Attenborough urges young people as he receives a Lifetime Achievement award 13 March 2019 Sir David Attenborough has urged young people to ‘get engaged, come together and do something’ about the threats facing the natural world.
  • Mindfulness found to improve mental health of students 13 March 2019 Mental health amongst university students could be improved by introducing mindfulness training. These are the findings from the first UK study, published in Education Research International, to measure the efficacy of mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on students.
  • Scientists put ichthyosaurs in virtual water tanks 6 March 2019 Using computer simulations and 3D models, palaeontologists from the University of Bristol have uncovered more detail on how Mesozoic sea dragons swam.
  • Molecular heaters to boost crop growth thanks to €4.9 million project 26 February 2019 A €4.9 million EU H2020 grant will enable a consortium of researchers from across Europe, to embark on a project called 'Boostcrop'. They will use state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical methodologies to design molecular heaters which will enhance crop growth under cold and freezing stress.
  • Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of two species of ancient reptile 26 February 2019 Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.
  • University of Bristol researchers embark on a programme to develop crop production technology 22 February 2019 Dr Antony Dodd, whose internationally leading research at the University of Bristol focuses on circadian rhythms, plant physiology and environmental signalling, has been awarded a Royal Society Industry Fellowship to contribute to product development at the Bristol-based start-up company LettUs Grow.
  • Honorary degrees awarded at the University of Bristol to Simon Pugh-Jones MBE 21 February 2019 Simon Pugh-Jones MBE is the founder of the Writhlington School Orchid project, which since 1993 has been leading conservation education initiatives in Africa, South Asia and Southeast Asia.
  • New degree will train next generation of plant biologists 21 February 2019 A new Plant Sciences degree that will train the next generation of plant researchers to tackle major issues such as global food security for a growing population has been launched by the University of Bristol.
  • Research reveals why the zebra got its stripes 21 February 2019 Why do zebras have stripes? A study published in PLOS ONE today [Wednesday 20 February] takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work.
  • Honorary degrees awarded at the University of Bristol – Wednesday 20 February 2019 20 February 2019 The University of Bristol is awarding honorary degrees to Fiona Fox OBE and Professor Maggie Snowling CBE at degree ceremonies taking place today [20 February] in the Wills Memorial Building.
  • Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt 14 February 2019 A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has used satellite technology provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) to uncover why the Agung volcano in Bali erupted in November 2017 after 50 years of dormancy.
  • Academy Award-winning actor Jeff Bridges partners with Bristol on environmental education programme 12 February 2019 Academy Award-winning actor and producer Jeff Bridges has partnered with the University of Bristol’s Cabot Institute for the Environment to produce a short film as part of his new educational programme around climate change.
  • New climate models suggest that future sea level rise could be much lower than previously feared 8 February 2019 Two papers published in Nature this week call into doubt recent predictions of imminent Antarctic ice sheet collapse. They are led by King’s College London and Victoria University of Wellington, and involve colleagues from across the US, Canada, UK and Europe, including the University of Bristol.
  • Deaf moth evolves sound-production as a warning to outwit its predator 6 February 2019 A genus of deaf moth has evolved to develop an extraordinary sound-producing structure in its wings to evade its primary predator the bat. The finding, made by researchers from the University of Bristol and Natural History Museum, is described in Scientific Reports today [Tuesday 5 February].
  • Looking East - botanical tales from China 5 February 2019 Last year marked the 17th year of the partnership between Bristol and Guangzhou (formerly Canton) in southern China and at a public talk later this month, the curator of the University of Bristol Botanic Garden will talk about his recent trip to China.
  • Bristol researchers share expertise to tackle global challenges 30 January 2019 Scientists from the University of Bristol will be sharing their expertise as part of two new £20 million UK Research and Innovation Global Research Hubs funded through the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF).
  • Bird beaks did not adapt to food types as previously thought 23 January 2019 A study, led by the University of Bristol, has shed some new light on how the beaks of birds have adapted over time.
  • Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation 15 January 2019 Given the pressures that pollinators face in agricultural land, cities could play an important role in conserving pollinators, according to a new study. The research, carried out by scientists at the Universities of Bristol, Edinburgh, Leeds and Reading in collaboration with Cardiff University and the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), has revealed that gardens and allotments are good for pollinators, and lavender and borage are important garden plants that pollinators use as food sources.
  • Subglacial weathering alters nutrient cycles in Greenland 10 January 2019 The nutrient cycles that underpin how carbon is stored and released from two of Greenland’s glaciers is significantly affected by subglacial weathering, a new study has found, shedding further light on the geochemistry of meltwaters.
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